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PeaceWeek – Global Online Telesummit

The Council for a Parliament of the World’s Religions is proud to be a co-sponsor of PeaceWeek 2011, a global telesummit featuring dozens of inspiring peacebuilders.

This free online event, coming up September 15-21, is the largest virtual peace summit ever created—last year more than 20,000 people registered from 152 countries. This year’s leaders will offer profound insights for you to create peace in your life, your family, your community and our world. You’ll also gain access to the full library of recordings from last year’s summit.

We invite you to take advantage of dozens of galvanizing and action-oriented sessions—all of which are recorded and freely available. When you sign up, you’ll hear about groundbreaking global work from Israel and India to China and many places in between.

Sign up for free here

Join us and thousands of others from around the world—all of whom care deeply about the future of our planet and the potential for humanity to make a profound shift from a culture of violence to a culture of peace.

 

Presenters Include:

Alice Walker · Deepak Chopra · Marianne Williamson · Arun Gandhi Michael Bernard Beckwith · Daniel Goleman · Jane Velez-Mitchell · James O’Dea · Barbara Marx Hubbard · Avon Mattison · Kimmie Weeks · Grandmother Mona Polacca · Grandmother Beatrice Long-Visitor Holy Dance · David Korten · Aqeela Sherrills · Dot Maver · Stephen Dinan · Derrick Ashong · Steve Killelea · Sister Jenna · Dena Merriam · Rob Fersh · Rita Marie Johnson · Paul Chappell · Brother Anilananda · Kevin Quigley · Devaa Haley Mitchell · Andy Barker · Jenn Lim · Captain Richard O’Neill · Michael Furdyk · Pooran Pandey · Chip Hauss · Hiu Ng · Miki Kashtan · Rev. Bob Chase · Nurah Amat’ullah · Rabbi Justus Baird · Mary Stata · Sahar Nafal Kordahi · Tzvia Shelef · Orland Bishop · Guy Burgess · Heidi Burgess · Dr. Rick Levy · Julia Bacha · Nick Stuart · David Nicol · Belvie Rooks · Matthew Albracht · Emily Hine · Philip Hellmich

 

Religious and Spiritual Leaders Reflect on 9/11

Beyond 9/11 to a Broader View of the World by Sister Joan Chittister, OSB

Healing, Hope and Humanity: A Sikh Reflection by Dr. Tarunjit Singh Butalia

It Is Time to Invoke Historys Other 9/11 of Nonviolence and Global Interfaith Dialogue by Anju Bhargava

9/11: Ten Years On by Eboo Patel

From Memory to Hope by Rev. Dr. Katharine Rhodes Henderson

Lessons from the Kaddish a Decade Later by Chancellor Arnold M. Eisen

WATCH: The Future Of Christian-Muslim Relations In The West

For A More Unified, Understanding New York by Georgette Bennett, Ph.D.

Did 9/11 Make Us Morally Better? by Miroslav Volf

Hate and Hope by Serene Jones

Reaching for Hope After 9/11 — Together by The Interfaith Amigos

WATCH: Finding Hope And Healing At Ground Zero

The Sukkah and the World Trade Center by Rabbi Arthur Waskow

An Opportunity For Reflection by Bishop Katherine Jefferts Schori

Our post-9/11 failures by Desmond Tutu

Unite through compassion by Karen Armstrong

Remaking the world after 9/11 by Tony Blair

Radical Islam on its way out by Feisal Abdul Rauf

9/11 demands intellectual honesty by Sam Harris

Rebuilding our souls by Thomas Monson

Spirituality after the attack by T.D. Jakes

Peace begins internally by Donald Wuerl

Live the memorial by Katharine Jefferts Schori

Death and the hope of resurrection by Mark Driscoll

Divided world, divided hearts by Deepak Chopra

We grasped our brokenness anew by David Wolpe

Americans still dont know Islam by Yasir Qadhi

A prayer for America by Sally Quinn

From Ground Zero to the State Dept by Suzan Cook

10 Years Later, We Must Do Better by Rabbi Michael M. Cohen

Second Global Conference On World’s Religions after September 11

The Dalai Lama returns to Montreal later this year on September 7, to address the Second Global Conference On World’s Religions after September 11, which will meet at the Palais des Congrès, almost after a decade following the events of 9/11.

Other renowned speakers include Nobel Peace Laureate Shirin Ebadi, world-famous author Deepak Chopra, Professor Tariq Ramadan, and Professor Robert Thurman. Professor Gregory Baum, recipient of the Order of Canada and Swami Dayananda Saraswati will also participate in the conference.

Under the theme of “Peace Through Religion”, the one-day event will include the unveiling of the latest version of a proposed Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the World’s Religions, which has been on the anvil since 1996 and which is designed as a complement to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948.

“The aim of the conference is to bring together the various religions of the world in an ecumenical spirit to address the many issues facing the world today, in the hope that this will help all of us become better human beings”, emphasized the convenor of the event, Arvind Sharma, Birks Professor of Comparative Religion at the Faculty of Religious Studies of McGill University.
Panel discussions with the speakers will seek to generate consensus around two fundamental social and religious issues:

  • Should a course on world religions also be taught whenever the confessional study or religion is carried out?

and

  • Should violating the sanctity of the scripture of any religion be considered tantamount to violating the sanctity of the scriptures of all religions?

The Conference is co-sponsored by McGill University and Université de Montréal.

Click here for more information

Interfaith Marriages Seek Sacred Ground

Chelsea Clinton & Marc MezvinskyFrom The Washington Post

Traditionally the various faiths of the world have been suspicious of each other, so it’s not really a surprise that interfaith marriages have high divorce rates. Just because you love someone doesn’t mean that you don’t harbor distrust at some level, in a secret compartment of the heart. If your family has conditioned you to believe that yours is the only true faith, a second element is added. Who wants to sacrifice part of themselves to please another person? When parents advise their children not to marry outside the faith, they aren’t passing on wisdom; more likely they are reminding their children not to stray from us-versus-them thinking.

The more productive topic is how to avoid such divorces. To do that, a young couple must find common ground in spiritual matters. This is happening already to some extent. The ties of dogma and orthodoxy have been weakening for decades. Yet there is something deep that needs to be solved: the paradox of faith. I would venture that faith itself can put strains on a marriage (I’m not working from pure instinct here: statistics show that the Bible Belt, where church attendance is highest, also enjoys the country’s highest divorce rate whereas the Northeast, which is much less religious — and also more educated, an important factor — enjoys the lowest). Faith becomes negative when it binds the mind into set, inflexible beliefs.

Sadly, this is the only type of faith that most religious people know, the type that prevents them from thinking about God or the soul on their own. The paradox, in simplest terms, is that having been told the right answers, people of faith feel less motivated to undertake their own spiritual journey. They aren’t troubled enough by doubt or be spurred by curiosity. Their chief dilemma is lapsed faith; they feel guilty for being less strict than generations which came before. (This is a generalization, of course; some spiritual journeys do begin on a strong basis of faith.) A faith composed of right answers sounds appealing, but marriages are about negotiation. That’s the bottom line, and when your spouse asks you to negotiate about religion, a small voice in the back of your mind is likely to guilt trip you. Religious practice feels literally like sacred ground.

Yet one person’s sacred ground is another person’s high horse. Couples must mutually decide to abandon the secret sureness of being right. This can’t be a tug of war. Nor can it be the sort of passive giving in that years later turns into active resentment. Faith is about conscience, so every step needs to be taken with a clear conscience. As love matures in a marriage, a shared spirituality becomes easier, because in your spouse you see aspects of the divine: love, trust, hope, and comfort. These serve as the basis for a practical kind of faith; God has acquired a human face. I suspect that when couples split on religious grounds — or at least cite religion in a long list of complaints — the real problem is that love didn’t mature. The issues brought into the union have continued to fester, generally out of sight.

Click here to read the entire article.

August 1st, 2010 at 6:06 am