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Archive for the ‘omaha’ tag

Auburn Media Training: Top Ten Tips to Speak Prophetically through the Press

Macky Alston

Macky Alston

Click here to watch the video Thursday, August 30, 2012

10:00am U.S. Central Time

Join Auburn Media’s Founding Director Macky Alston for this workshop that will outline the top ten tips you need to remember to get your voice heard through the media. Voices of faith who are interested in using the upcoming news hook of the anniversary of September 11th as an opportunity to bridge religious divides are encouraged to join this special workshop.

Macky Alston is Senior Director of Auburn Media at Auburn Theological Seminary, and dedicated to informed coverage of religion in the media. Macky is an award-winning filmmaker and an organizer in the worlds of media and religion. He has received two Sundance Film Festival Awards, the Gotham Open Palm Award, three Emmy nominations, and has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Today Show and in The New York Times. Alston is currently screening his new documentary LOVE FREE OR DIE about Gene Robinson, the first openly gay person to become a bishop in the historic traditions of Christendom.

 

Title: Auburn Media Training: Top Ten Tips to Speak Prophetically through the Press

Date: Thursday, August 30, 2012
Time: 10:00am CDT
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees:
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Macintosh®-based attendees:
Required: Mac OS® X 10.4.11 (Tiger®) or newer

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/842178510

All of our webinars are recorded.  Click here to watch webinars

 

Reimagining Interfaith Conversation: Engaging Your Community Through Multimedia

Beth Katz

Beth Katz

Click here to watch the video Wednesday, August 1, 2012

10:00am U.S. Central Time

Identity, religion, spirituality, and culture — these topics define our interactions with others but normally are taboo in conversation. How can we create a new normal in which families and communities openly and respectfully learn and share about these important aspects of identity? This webinar offers concrete strategies for doing so and reflects on other lessons learned from Project Interfaith’s most recent program, RavelUnravel.com.

Launched in May 2012, RavelUnravel.com is a multimedia exploration of the religious and spiritual identities that make up our communities and world. This unique site features over 720 video interviews where individuals from a wide variety of religious and spiritual identities discuss their identities in a personal way, as well as the stereotypes that impact them and whether or not their communities have welcomed their chosen religious or spiritual paths.

Beth Katz is Founder and Executive Director of Project Interfaith. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Nebraska at Omaha where she has taught courses on international conflict resolution and religious diversity. She also is a member of the Nebraska Medical Center’s Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Consultation Committee and serves on the Mayor’s Clergy Advisory Board in Omaha as well as the board of the Center for Catholic Thought and Culture at Creighton University. In 2012, she was the recipient of the President’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Legacy Award from Creighton University and was named one of the Ten Outstanding Young Omahans (TOYO) by the Omaha Jaycees.

 

Title: Reimagining Interfaith Conversation: Engaging Your Community Through Multimedia 

Date: Wednesday, August 1, 2012
Time: 10:00am CDT
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees:
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Macintosh®-based attendees:
Required: Mac OS® X 10.4.11 (Tiger®) or newer

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/317260390

All of our webinars are recorded.  Click here to watch webinars

 

RavelUnravel: the Community Mosaic Video Project

RavelUnravel Trailer

Watch the RavelUnravel Trailer

by Beth Katz
Project Interfaith

“Wait, you’re a Muslim? But you’re not even brown!” This question inspired RavelUnravel, Project Interfaith’s interactive, multimedia project launching this spring about the diversity of religious and spiritual identities that make up our communities and world.

Emina, a participant in Project Interfaith’s 2010 Interfaith Youth Service Project, faced this reaction from a fellow college student as she prepared to log her first video blog entry. But instead of lashing out at someone’s ignorant comment, she used the experience as an opportunity to explain her identity as a Muslim and the diversity within Islam.

We at Project Interfaith were struck by this as we watched. We thought, “What if we could give more people the chance to define and share their religious or spiritual identity in their own words and confront the misconceptions they face because of this?” Thus, RavelUnravel was born.

We started by putting a call out for volunteers to serve as interviewers for this project and ultimately chose 35 individuals, ranging in age from 20 to 80 years old and belonging to 14 different religious or spiritual identities and multiple ethnicities.  Our goal was to have the interviewers armed with handheld, cordless Flip camcorders capture 150 videos of community members of diverse beliefs and cultures in the Omaha, Nebraska metropolitan area answering the same set of questions:

  • What is your religious or spiritual identity and why do you identify as such?
  • What is a stereotype that impacts you based on your religious or spiritual identity?
  • How welcoming do you find our community to be to follow your religious or spiritual path?
  • Is there anything else you would like us to know about you and your religion or belief system?

RavelUnravel

The RavelUnravel site will include:

  • 720+ video interviews collected from residents in the Omaha metropolitan area;
  • an interactive comments forum;
  • four downloadable discussion guides (one each to use with high school students, college students, community groups, and in the workplace);
  • links to credible, educational resources on religious and cultural diversity; and
  • information about other Project Interfaith programs and resources.

Users also may:

  • make a video answering the four interview questions using their web or cell cameras and upload these videos to the site;
  • create and share on the site and through social media a customized collection of their favorite viewed videos;
  • engage in discussions using the online forums and discussion guides;  and
  • view a randomly-selected video by using the site’s “shuffle” function.

To ensure we got a diverse cross-section of the community, we reached out to religious and spiritual communities, community groups, businesses, non-profit organizations, and colleges, inviting them to host an interview team for a morning or afternoon.  We also welcomed community members to drop in at the Project Interfaith office to be interviewed.

The response blew us away.

We ended up having so many people that wanted to be interviewed for this project that we had to extend the interview period from September 2010 to March 2011 — instead of ending in December 2010 as originally planned.

We now have over 720 video interviews, representing a wide array of theistic and non-theistic religious and spiritual identities including Agnostic, Atheist, Secular Humanist, Baha’i, Buddhist, Hindu, Jehovah’s Witness, Jewish, Latter-day Saints, Muslim, Native American, Orthodox Christian, Protestant Christian, Roman Catholic, Seeker, Seventh Day Adventist, Sikh, Spiritual, Unitarian, Wiccan, and other identities.

These videos, along with a host of educational resources, will be featured on a new interactive website we are currently building at ravelunravel.com.

In the name RavelUnravel, we’re exploring the tapestry of religious and spiritual identities that make up our communities and world and the complexities of how we construct and deconstruct identity.  We hope this site puts a human face on religious and spiritual diversity and exposes the tremendous variety of beliefs and practices within religious and spiritual identity groups — thereby transforming the way users understand, learn and talk about identity, spirituality, religion and culture.

We are planning to launch the site this April, so stay tuned!

Click here to watch the RavelUnravel Trailer 

 

A Church, a Shul and a Mosque Try Faithful Experiment

By Naomi Zeveloff
From The Jewish Daily Forward

Deep in America’s heartland, a Reform synagogue, a nondenominational mosque and an Episcopalian church are all putting down roots on a 37-acre tract of land that once belonged to a Jewish country club. A body of water called Hell Creek runs through the development, over which the faith groups plan to build “Heaven’s Bridge.”

Fantastical as it sounds, this interfaith campus is currently in the works in Omaha, Neb. Slated for completion in 2014, the Tri-Faith Initiative is an experiment in religious coexistence in a city better known as a hub of corn-fed conservatism.

“The only other place where such a thing exists is Jerusalem,” said Dr. Syed Mohiuddin, chairman of the Creighton University School of Medicine. Mohiuddin’s organization, the American Institute of Islamic Studies and Culture, is building a mosque on the campus. “Jerusalem is so important to these three faiths. We are sort of reproducing that model.”

If the experiment works, the city of Omaha — with a metropolitan area population of about 900,000, including 5,500 Jews, 6,000 Muslims and 4,500 Episcopalians — will become a beacon of cooperation in a world of interreligious strife. But before that can happen, the three groups still need to navigate fears, stereotypes and bureaucratic hang-ups.

The story of the Tri-Faith Initiative began with a simple quest for a parking lot. Temple Israel, the largest synagogue in Omaha, is located in the city’s congested downtown district. On the High Holy Days, the Reform congregation borrows parking space from its two neighbors, the Omaha Community Playhouse and the First United Methodist Church. When Temple Israel’s leaders decided to relocate the congregation to West Omaha, where many of the synagogue’s members now live, they reached out to Mohiuddin, who was planning a nondenominational mosque in the same neighborhood.

“It wasn’t a directive from the rabbi to say, ‘Go get with this group of Muslims,’” said Jon Meyers, a board member at Temple Israel. “Having said that, we realized: ‘Hey, this is a really cool thing. Why don’t we look at exploring this?’”

Click here to read the full article.

December 21st, 2011 at 10:45 am