The Parliament Blog

Archive for the ‘organizing’ tag

Auburn Media Training: Top Ten Tips to Speak Prophetically through the Press

Macky Alston

Macky Alston

Click here to watch the video Thursday, August 30, 2012

10:00am U.S. Central Time

Join Auburn Media’s Founding Director Macky Alston for this workshop that will outline the top ten tips you need to remember to get your voice heard through the media. Voices of faith who are interested in using the upcoming news hook of the anniversary of September 11th as an opportunity to bridge religious divides are encouraged to join this special workshop.

Macky Alston is Senior Director of Auburn Media at Auburn Theological Seminary, and dedicated to informed coverage of religion in the media. Macky is an award-winning filmmaker and an organizer in the worlds of media and religion. He has received two Sundance Film Festival Awards, the Gotham Open Palm Award, three Emmy nominations, and has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, The Today Show and in The New York Times. Alston is currently screening his new documentary LOVE FREE OR DIE about Gene Robinson, the first openly gay person to become a bishop in the historic traditions of Christendom.

 

Title: Auburn Media Training: Top Ten Tips to Speak Prophetically through the Press

Date: Thursday, August 30, 2012
Time: 10:00am CDT
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees:
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Macintosh®-based attendees:
Required: Mac OS® X 10.4.11 (Tiger®) or newer

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/842178510

All of our webinars are recorded.  Click here to watch webinars

 

Reimagining Interfaith Conversation: Engaging Your Community Through Multimedia

Beth Katz

Beth Katz

Click here to watch the video Wednesday, August 1, 2012

10:00am U.S. Central Time

Identity, religion, spirituality, and culture — these topics define our interactions with others but normally are taboo in conversation. How can we create a new normal in which families and communities openly and respectfully learn and share about these important aspects of identity? This webinar offers concrete strategies for doing so and reflects on other lessons learned from Project Interfaith’s most recent program, RavelUnravel.com.

Launched in May 2012, RavelUnravel.com is a multimedia exploration of the religious and spiritual identities that make up our communities and world. This unique site features over 720 video interviews where individuals from a wide variety of religious and spiritual identities discuss their identities in a personal way, as well as the stereotypes that impact them and whether or not their communities have welcomed their chosen religious or spiritual paths.

Beth Katz is Founder and Executive Director of Project Interfaith. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Nebraska at Omaha where she has taught courses on international conflict resolution and religious diversity. She also is a member of the Nebraska Medical Center’s Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Consultation Committee and serves on the Mayor’s Clergy Advisory Board in Omaha as well as the board of the Center for Catholic Thought and Culture at Creighton University. In 2012, she was the recipient of the President’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Legacy Award from Creighton University and was named one of the Ten Outstanding Young Omahans (TOYO) by the Omaha Jaycees.

 

Title: Reimagining Interfaith Conversation: Engaging Your Community Through Multimedia 

Date: Wednesday, August 1, 2012
Time: 10:00am CDT
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees:
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Macintosh®-based attendees:
Required: Mac OS® X 10.4.11 (Tiger®) or newer

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/317260390

All of our webinars are recorded.  Click here to watch webinars

 

Why Interfaith Organizing Matters: Social Change Starts With Values

Amy Dean is co-author, with David Reynolds, of "A New New Deal: How Regional Activism Will Reshape the American Labor Movement" and is president and founder of ABD Ventures. She worked for nearly two decades in the labor movement and now works to develop new and innovative organizing strategies for social change organizations. Photo from Google Images.

by Amy B. Dean
from the Huffington Post

Sometimes, as an activist, you look upon the world and think you will never be able to see the changes you seek in your own lifetime. It’s easy to despair, to succumb to the isolation and self-doubt that come from being a thoughtful person trying to change the status quo.

In those moments, I’ve learned to find renewal and hope not in myself, but in other organizers, in our shared values and experiences. Saul Alinsky wrote, “We must believe that it is the darkest before the dawn of a beautiful new world. We will see it when we believe it.” A shared belief in what is actually possible to achieve, despite what others may tell us: that is the organizer’s gift.

In one respect, this principle sounds self-evident. And yet, while our social movements are often full of talk about policy, tactics or messaging, values are regularly left to linger in the background. They become things that are left to theologians to debate, or we allow values to be a walled-off part of the political conversation.

Click here to read the full article

Unexpected Diversity: Interfaith Organizing from the Bottom Up

Matthew Weiner

Matthew Weiner

Register Now Wednesday, June 20, 2012
12:00pm U.S. Central Time

The interreligious movement has no road map: we are creating it as we go. Effective interfaith work today requires new methods and a new kind of grassroots organizing. The movement is not static. It is an experiment.

This webinar will seek to address the following questions: How do we creatively organize religious and spiritual communities when the desired outcome is not a fixed idea and can change? How can our work be genuinely inclusive of traditions that are more conservative? How can religious communities better engage with the secular public?

Matthew Weiner has worked as an interfaith organizer for 20 years, and he now serves as Associate Dean of Religious Life at Princeton University. He served for ten years as Program Director for the Interfaith Center of New York, where he developed a methodology for engaging religiously diverse communities through civil society, working with over 500 grassroots religious leaders and the New York State Court System, the New York Public Library, Catholic Charities, the New York Board of Rabbis, and the United Nations. He earned a Ph.D. from Union Theological Seminary, an M.T.S. from Harvard Divinity School, and an BA from New York University. He writes about public religion, interfaith and civil society, and engaged Buddhism.

 

Title: Unexpected Diversity:  Interfaith Organizing from the Bottom Up 

Date: Wednesday, June 20, 2012
Time: 12:00pm CDT
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees:
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Macintosh®-based attendees:
Required: Mac OS® X 10.4.11 (Tiger®) or newer

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/715513238

Click here to see more webinars and recordings of previous webinars

 

IFYC Hosts Summer Interfaith Leadership Institutes in Chicago and Philadelphia

from Interfaith Youth Core

What if you were equipped to mobilize a movement for interfaith cooperation on your campus? Join us at one of our Interfaith Leadership Institutes (ILIs) for students, faculty, and staff. You’ll return to campus with the core skills of interfaith leadership, ready to organize Better Together.

Join us from June 18-21 in Chicago or July 16-19 in Philadelphia for an ILI. Click here to apply by April 16. (Apply by March 26 and save $50). If you have any questions, email leadershipinstitute@ifyc.org or look below for more information.

Young Feminist Wire E-learning Sessions On Religious Fundamentalisms

from Association for Women’s Rights in Development

The Young Feminist Wire is announcing its FINAL call for registration for the last TWO sessions of 2011 in its e-learning series ‘Interrogating Movements’. Deadline for registrations for both sessions: November 28, 2011.

In response to rising social unrest all over the world, more discussions are happening in online spaces such as Twitter and the blogosphere on effective organizing practices and how to build movements that lead to social change. The Young Feminist Wire launched a series of e-learning sessions in the summer of 2011 to provide a space for women rights advocates and activists, especially young women, to reflect on their own organizing practices by drawing from examples from the current changing global political context.

The final two e-learning sessions of 2011 will be held on the 2nd and 9th of December and will focus on the global trend of rising religious fundamentalisms and its impact on women’s rights. The first session on the 2nd of December will provide an overview and space to discuss some of the concepts related to the term ‘religious fundamentalisms’. The following session on the 9th of December will focus on the way religious fundamentalisms function to obstruct rights and feminist counter-strategies to challenge them. Click HERE for session descriptions and further detail.

Click here for more information

Webinar: Learning from the Egyptian Revolution

Ahmed Rehab

Ahmed Rehab

Register Now Rescheduled! New Time: 

Wednesday, August 10, 2011
10:00am U.S. Central Time

The Egyptian Revolution saw one of the largest and most comprehensive peaceful revolutions in history. 12 million people took to the streets in a period of 18 days to oust a 30 year autocratic president and a 60 year entrenched regime. The Egypt revolution was non-ideological, non-partisan, and non-sectarian, and as thus represents a case study in the psychology, process, and implementation of unifying mass movements. What were the key ingredients that helped pull off one of the greatest revolutions in history? Ahmed Rehab, who participated in the Tahrir Square movement, shares his first-hand account.

Ahmed Rehab is an American Muslim activist and writer with a focus on contemporary social issues including civil rights, media relations, and Islam-West relations. Rehab is a regular contributor to the Chicago Tribune, the Huffington Post, and CNN.com.  He is currently the Executive Director of the Chicago chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-Chicago), a Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization which under Rehab’s tenure has developed from a start-up into one of the most notable not-for-profit civil rights offices of its kind anywhere in the United States.

Title: Lessons from the Egyptian Revolution
Date: Wednesday, August 10, 2011
Time: 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM CDT
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees:
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Macintosh®-based attendees:
Required: Mac OS® X 10.4.11 (Tiger®) or newer

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/514505998

Interfaith Youth Core hosts Leadership Institutes

Interfaith Youth Core is offering opportunities for training to empower the interfaith movement on college campuses.

Interfaith Leadership Institutes are 3-day intensives that equip students and their campus allies to be movement builders for interfaith action. Come find out how your campus can join the growing number of campuses who are changing the way they think about religious diversity through the Better Together Campaign.

Upcoming Institutes:

  • June 28 – July 1, Dominican University in Chicagoland
  • July 25- 28, Georgetown University in Washington D.C.
  • Fall, TBD, West Coast

Applications are due May 20. Apply by May 10, 2011 to save $50 per person.

The Better Together Campaign is about students of diverse religious and non-religious beliefs working to make the world Better – Together. It is a campus-based campaign of interfaith action in which students choose an issue to impact (like domestic poverty or global warming) and tackle it by working together. Each campus can send a delegation of up to three students and up to two staff or faculty allies to attend an Institute.

Students should apply if you’re excited about creating a movement of interfaith action on your campus by organizing the Better Together Campaign during the next school year. This Institute will give you three jam-packed, high-energy days of trainings, relationship building, and inspiration, equipping you to:

  • Speak out on the importance of interfaith action,
  • Mobilize fellow students to take action, and
  • Sustain your efforts to create a lasting impact on campus.

Staff and faculty members should apply if you want to network, share best practices on interfaith work with your colleagues from other campuses, and support student leaders as they plan their Better Together Campaign. The Institute will provide you with the concrete skills to:

  • Engage religious diversity on campus in new, creative, and positive ways;
  • Bridge student-led efforts to interfaith initiatives across your institution;
  • Expand the depth, scope, and reach of interfaith engagement on campus; and
  • Lead efforts to transform your institution into a model of interfaith cooperation.

For more information, please visit ifyc.org